Networking explained

network and routers explainedA network router is a more sophisticated network device compared to either a network switch or a network hub. Like hubs and switches, routers are typically small, box-like pieces of equipment that multiple computers can connect to. Each features a number of ports on the front or back of the unit that provide the connection points for these computers, a connection for electric power, and a number of LED lights to display device status. While routers, hubs and switches all share similar physical appearance, routers differ substantially in their inner workings. 

Wi-Fi (802.11ac) explained

WiFi 802.11 AC explained802.11ac or 5G Wi-Fi: This latest Wi-Fi standard operates only on the 5GHz frequency band and offers Wi-Fi speeds of up to 1.3Gbps (or 1,300Mbps).

It’s backward-compatible with N, meaning that a 5G Wi-Fi router will support N clients and 5G Wi-Fi clients will also be able to connect to an N router. Wireless-N, in turn, is backward compatible with the rest of the wireless standards, including 802.11g, 802.11b, and 802.11a.